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INGER

Integrating gender into environmental health research: Building a sound evidence basis for gender-sensitive prevention and environmental health protection

The project aims to develop methods for sex/gender-sensitive data collection and data analyses in population-based studies on environmental health to build a sound basis for sex/gender-sensitive prevention and environmental health protection.

INGER

Integrating gender into environmental health research: Building a sound evidence basis for gender-sensitive prevention and environmental health protection

The project aims to develop methods for sex/gender-sensitive data collection and data analyses in population-based studies on environmental health to build a sound basis for sex/gender-sensitive prevention and environmental health protection.

Overview

Knowledge about the multiple pathways on which sex and gender do affect health is an inevitable condition for preventive action. However, sex and gender have been largely neglected in environmental health research so far. In this project, sex/gender-sensitive research methods are developed for conceptualization and operationalization of sex/gender in data collection and analyses. Thereby, the project is supplied by gender-theoretical perspectives. The project is designed as close interdisciplinary collaboration between environmental epidemiology, toxicology, public health, and gender studies.

  1. To assess the current state of consideration of sex/gender in environmental health research via systematic reviews
  2. To develop new questionnaire modules based on gender theoretical concepts in consideration of acceptability and practical requirements of data collection in population-based studies on environmental health
  3. Data collection in the KORA (Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg) cohort and the German Environmental Specimen Bank
  4. To identify methodological approaches of multivariable data analyses adequate to quantify sex/gender impacts on environmental exposures and health
  5. To build an evidence basis to detect susceptible population groups and minimize health risks from environmental exposures and to derive recommendations for practice of gender-sensitive environment health protection and prevention

Mixed-methods design comprising systematic reviews and meta-analyses, questionnaire development, multivariable data analyses of newly collected and already available data, and interdisciplinary integration of results.

 

  • Representative study population of KORA (Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg, adults aged ≥ 25 years)
  • Non-representative study population of the Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB, adults aged 20-29 years)

Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany (funding period: July 2017 – December 2021)

  • University of Bremen, Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research, Department of Social Epidemiology (leading partner; Gabriele Bolte (PI), Lisa Dandolo, Christina Hartig, Sophie Horstmann)
  • Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Epidemiology, Research Group “Environmental Risks“, Neuherberg, Germany (Alexandra Schneider, Ute Kraus)
  • German Environment Agency, Dessau-Rosslau, Berlin, Germany (Marike Kolossa-Gehring, Malgorzata Debiak, Katrin Groth, Sophie Fichter)
  • Humboldt-University of Berlin, Institute of History, Gender and Science, Berlin, Germany (Kerstin Palm, Katharina Jacke)

Knowledge about the multiple pathways on which sex and gender do affect health is an inevitable condition for preventive action. However, sex and gender have been largely neglected in environmental health research so far. In this project, sex/gender-sensitive research methods are developed for conceptualization and operationalization of sex/gender in data collection and analyses. Thereby, the project is supplied by gender-theoretical perspectives. The project is designed as close interdisciplinary collaboration between environmental epidemiology, toxicology, public health, and gender studies.

  1. To assess the current state of consideration of sex/gender in environmental health research via systematic reviews
  2. To develop new questionnaire modules based on gender theoretical concepts in consideration of acceptability and practical requirements of data collection in population-based studies on environmental health
  3. Data collection in the KORA (Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg) cohort and the German Environmental Specimen Bank
  4. To identify methodological approaches of multivariable data analyses adequate to quantify sex/gender impacts on environmental exposures and health
  5. To build an evidence basis to detect susceptible population groups and minimize health risks from environmental exposures and to derive recommendations for practice of gender-sensitive environment health protection and prevention

Mixed-methods design comprising systematic reviews and meta-analyses, questionnaire development, multivariable data analyses of newly collected and already available data, and interdisciplinary integration of results.

 

  • Representative study population of KORA (Kooperative Gesundheitsforschung in der Region Augsburg, adults aged ≥ 25 years)
  • Non-representative study population of the Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB, adults aged 20-29 years)

Federal Ministry of Education and Research in Germany (funding period: July 2017 – December 2021)

  • University of Bremen, Institute for Public Health and Nursing Research, Department of Social Epidemiology (leading partner; Gabriele Bolte (PI), Lisa Dandolo, Christina Hartig, Sophie Horstmann)
  • Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Epidemiology, Research Group “Environmental Risks“, Neuherberg, Germany (Alexandra Schneider, Ute Kraus)
  • German Environment Agency, Dessau-Rosslau, Berlin, Germany (Marike Kolossa-Gehring, Malgorzata Debiak, Katrin Groth, Sophie Fichter)
  • Humboldt-University of Berlin, Institute of History, Gender and Science, Berlin, Germany (Kerstin Palm, Katharina Jacke)

Contact PI

Dr. Ute Kraus

Senior Scientist

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